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You Say You Want A Revolution? The Beatles, Live Performance

23 Feb

Copyright 2011-3011 By CK Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

“Revolution” by the Beatles, Lyrics:

Send “Revolution” Ringtone to your Cell

You say you want a revolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
You tell me that it’s evolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
But when you talk about destruction
Don’t you know that you can count me out
Don’t you know it’s gonna be all right
all right, all right

You say you got a real solution
Well, you know
We’d all love to see the plan
You ask me for a contribution
Well, you know
We’re doing what we can
But when you want money
for people with minds that hate
All I can tell is brother you have to wait
Don’t you know it’s gonna be all right
all right, all right
Ah

ah, ah, ah, ah, ah…

You say you’ll change the constitution
Well, you know
We all want to change your head
You tell me it’s the institution
Well, you know
You better free you mind instead
But if you go carrying pictures of chairman Mao
You ain’t going to make it with anyone anyhow
Don’t you know it’s gonna be all right
all right, all right
all right, all right, all right
all right, all right, all right

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WANTED: A New Presidency for America

15 Feb
President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Sing...

Walking the Red Carpet with Mubarak in Days Gone By

Copyright 2011-3011 By Chase Kyla Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

You know it’s bad when the new world order “White House” directed mass media agencies begin to tell the truth about the cluelessness, insulated narcissism and inept  foreign policy of the Obama administration.

Imagine: everything that tea party blogs and truth researchers have been screaming on the internet for five years now about this man, this calculatedly aloof and inept President, who pretended he was America’s new political Messiah four years ago, is finally, four years too late, being discussed in “official” American media outlets. I could just shake the men and women at Newsweek, clanking their heads together.

Where was all this truthful reporting with “eyes wide open” when we needed it four years ago? I personally hope Newsweek goes out of business in karmic retribution for their absolute and purposed failing to vet and investigate this man four years ago when he came out of far left field, [where he lives], to run for national office, three years after admitting to reporters he did not have the experience to do so.

The mass media numbskulls who elected this man now have the sad and silly karmic duty of reporting on his collapsing presidency to the nation, as if we didn’t already know. We were all three to four years ahead of you, Newsweek. You are so fired.

Chase Kyla Hunter

Cited:

Wanted: A Grand Strategy for America [ Formerly Titled: “Egypt: How Obama Blew It”

NEWSWEEK’s new columnist on Obama’s Egypt debacle and the vacuum it exposes.

President Barack Obama in front of the Sphinx during a tour of the Great Pyramids of Giza following his landmark speech to the Muslim World on June 4, 2009. Barack Obama Strikes A Pose in Egypt: He Would Have made A Better Gucci Model Than A President. Photo courtesy of Mandel Ngan / AFP-Getty Images

President Barack Obama in front of the Sphinx during a tour of the Great Pyramids of Giza following his landmark speech to the Muslim World on June 4, 2009.

“The statesman can only wait and listen until he hears the footsteps of God resounding through events; then he must jump up and grasp the hem of His coat, that is all.” Thus Otto von Bismarck, the great Prussian statesman who united Germany and thereby reshaped Europe’s balance of power nearly a century and a half ago.

Last week, for the second time in his presidency, Barack Obama heard those footsteps, jumped up to grasp a historic opportunity … and missed it completely.

In Bismarck’s case it was not so much God’s coattails he caught as the revolutionary wave of mid-19th-century German nationalism. And he did more than catch it; he managed to surf it in a direction of his own choosing. The wave Obama just missed—again—is the revolutionary wave of Middle Eastern democracy. It has surged through the region twice since he was elected: once in Iran in the summer of 2009, the second time right across North Africa, from Tunisia all the way down the Red Sea to Yemen. But the swell has been biggest in Egypt, the Middle East’s most populous country.

In each case, the president faced stark alternatives. He could try to catch the wave, Bismarck style, by lending his support to the youthful revolutionaries and trying to ride it in a direction advantageous to American interests. Or he could do nothing and let the forces of reaction prevail. In the case of Iran, he did nothing, and the thugs of the Islamic Republic ruthlessly crushed the demonstrations. This time around, in Egypt, it was worse. He did both—some days exhorting Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to leave, other days drawing back and recommending an “orderly transition.”

The result has been a foreign-policy debacle. The president has alienated everybody: not only Mubarak’s cronies in the military, but also the youthful crowds in the streets of Cairo. Whoever ultimately wins, Obama loses. And the alienation doesn’t end there. America’s two closest friends in the region—Israel and Saudi Arabia—are both disgusted. The Saudis, who dread all manifestations of revolution, are appalled at Washington’s failure to resolutely prop up Mubarak. The Israelis, meanwhile, are dismayed by the administration’s apparent cluelessness.

Last week, while other commentators ran around Cairo’s Tahrir Square, hyperventilating about what they saw as an Arab 1989, I flew to Tel Aviv for the annual Herzliya security conference. The consensus among the assembled experts on the Middle East? A colossal failure of American foreign policy.

This failure was not the result of bad luck. It was the predictable consequence of the Obama administration’s lack of any kind of coherent grand strategy, a deficit about which more than a few veterans of U.S. foreign policy making have long worried. The president himself is not wholly to blame. Although cosmopolitan by both birth and upbringing, Obama was an unusually parochial politician prior to his election, judging by his scant public pronouncements on foreign-policy issues.

Yet no president can be expected to be omniscient. That is what advisers are for. The real responsibility for the current strategic vacuum lies not with Obama himself, but with the National Security Council, and in particular with the man who ran it until last October: retired Gen. James L. Jones. I suspected at the time of his appointment that General Jones was a poor choice. A big, bluff Marine, he once astonished me by recommending that Turkish troops might lend the United States support in Iraq. He seemed mildly surprised when I suggested the Iraqis might resent such a reminder of centuries of Ottoman Turkish rule.

The best national-security advisers have combined deep knowledge of international relations with an ability to play the Machiavellian Beltway game, which means competing for the president’s ear against the other would-be players in the policymaking process: not only the defense secretary but also the secretary of state and the head of the Central Intelligence Agency. No one has ever done this better than Henry Kissinger. But the crucial thing about Kissinger as national-security adviser was not the speed with which he learned the dark arts of interdepartmental turf warfare. It was the skill with which he, in partnership with Richard Nixon, forged a grand strategy for the United States at a time of alarming geopolitical instability.

The essence of that strategy was, first, to prioritize (for example, détente with the Soviets before human-rights issues within the U.S.S.R.) and then to exert pressure by deliberately linking key issues. In their hardest task—salvaging peace with honor in Indochina by preserving the independence of South Vietnam—Nixon and Kissinger ultimately could not succeed. But in the Middle East they were able to eject the Soviets from a position of influence and turn Egypt from a threat into a malleable ally. And their overtures to China exploited the divisions within the Communist bloc, helping to set Beijing on an epoch-making new course of economic openness.

The contrast between the foreign policy of the Nixon-Ford years and that of President Jimmy Carter is a stark reminder of how easily foreign policy can founder when there is a failure of strategic thinking. The Iranian Revolution of 1979, which took the Carter administration wholly by surprise, was a catastrophe far greater than the loss of South Vietnam.

Remind you of anything? “This is what happens when you get caught by surprise,” an anonymous American official told The New York Times last week. “We’ve had endless strategy sessions for the past two years on Mideast peace, on containing Iran. And how many of them factored in the possibility that Egypt moves from stability to turmoil? None.”

I can think of no more damning indictment of the administration’s strategic thinking than this: it never once considered a scenario in which Mubarak faced a popular revolt. Yet the very essence of rigorous strategic thinking is to devise such a scenario and to think through the best responses to them, preferably two or three moves ahead of actual or potential adversaries. It is only by doing these things—ranking priorities and gaming scenarios—that a coherent foreign policy can be made. The Israelis have been hard at work doing this. All the president and his NSC team seem to have done is to draft touchy-feely speeches like the one he delivered in Cairo early in his presidency.

These were his words back in June 2009:

America and Islam are not exclusive and need not be in competition. Instead, they overlap, and share common principles—principles of justice and progress; tolerance and the dignity of all human beings.

Those lines will come back to haunt Obama if, as cannot be ruled out, the ultimate beneficiary of his bungling in Egypt is the Muslim Brotherhood, which remains by far the best organized opposition force in the country—and wholly committed to the restoration of the caliphate and the strict application of Sharia. Would such an outcome advance “tolerance and the dignity of all human beings” in Egypt? Somehow, I don’t think so.

Grand strategy is all about the necessity of choice. Today, it means choosing between a daunting list of objectives: to resist the spread of radical Islam, to limit Iran’s ambition to become dominant in the Middle East, to contain the rise of China as an economic rival, to guard against a Russian “reconquista” of Eastern Europe—and so on. The defining characteristic of Obama’s foreign policy has been not just a failure to prioritize, but also a failure to recognize the need to do so. A succession of speeches saying, in essence, “I am not George W. Bush” is no substitute for a strategy.

Bismarck knew how to choose. He understood that riding the nationalist wave would enable Prussia to become the dominant force in Germany, but that thereafter the No. 1 objective must be to keep France and Russia from uniting against his new Reich. When asked for his opinion about colonizing Africa, Bismarck famously replied: “My map of Africa lies in Europe. Here lies Russia and here lies France, and we are in the middle. That is my map of Africa.”

Tragically, no one knows where Barack Obama’s map of the Middle East is. At best, it is in the heartland states of America, where the fate of his presidency will be decided next year, just as Jimmy Carter’s was back in 1980.

At worst, he has no map at all.

Israel Closes It’s Embassy in Cairo, Pulls Flag Amid Concerns for Future

14 Feb

Copyright 2011-3011 By Chase Kyla Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

Tags: Israeli Embassy closing, Cairo Israeli Embassy, Egypt Revolt 2011

Updated: Egypt’s Military Imposes Martial Law

14 Feb

Copyright 2.14.11 By CK Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

Repost courtesy of the Washington Post

Egypt in turmoil

Full coverage of the Egyptian protests

Egypt’s generals impose martial law

Gallery
Ruling council says it will run the country for six months or until elections are held; tensions flare as military evicts protesters in Tahrir Square.

Washington Post Foreign Service
Sunday, February 13, 2011; 11:00 PM

CAIRO – Egypt’s generals imposed martial law on Sunday, dissolving parliament and suspending the constitution, moves that many of the protesters who helped topple President Hosni Mubarak said were necessary to excise a rotten form of government.

The sweeping actions appeared to have their desired effect of calming the national mood. Under a celebratory facade, Egypt has remained on edge since Mubarak was forced to abdicate Friday, as uncertainty grew over the revolution’s next stages.

In a written communique, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, led by Field Marshal Mohammed Tantawi, said the military rule was temporary and would last until elections are held, possibly as soon as six months from now. A new set of guiding laws will be drafted by an appointed committee and made subject to a referendum, the military chiefs said.

The parliament disbanded by the military had been a rubber-stamp body dominated by ruling-party members who prevailed in rigged November elections. The constitution had also been skewed heavily in favor of Mubarak’s regime.

Opposition figures praised the moves as important first steps toward free elections but urged further measures to sweep away the old guard. Some expressed alarm at an aborted effort by the military early Sunday to clear Cairo‘s Tahrir Square of remaining protesters. They also criticized a decision by the military rulers to leave Mubarak’s cabinet in place.

“By no means can they concentrate on fixing the problems and investigating what happened under the former regime, because they are the ones responsible,” said Alaa al Aswany, an Egyptian novelist and democracy activist.

It remains far from clear how quickly elections might be held in Egypt. The well-organized Muslim Brotherhood, officially banned under Mubarak, has pressed for speedy elections. Some democracy activists have said that it might take much longer than six months to prepare the ground for a fair contest.

Some unrest continued in Cairo, as about 500 police officers, demanding higher wages, marched through Tahrir Square and blocked the entrance to the Interior Ministry. Workers at state banks held sit-ins, forcing Egypt’s central bank to declare Monday a bank holiday. The antiquities-rich Egyptian Museum reported that two statues of King Tutankhamen and 16 other artworks had been looted.

“Our concern now is security, to bring security back to the Egyptian citizen,” Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq said after presiding over a meeting of the caretaker cabinet. “That sense has been lost since the beginning of the events. It’s been coming back, but not as quickly as we hoped.”

Before the session, workers removed a huge portrait of Mubarak that had kept watch over the meeting room.

Unlike the police and other domestic security forces that Mubarak used to brutalize his political foes, the armed forces are seen by many Egyptians as their protectors and saviors. The military permitted the protests to unfold peacefully during the 18-day revolution. Many soldiers and officers made clear that their sympathies lay with the people.

For the near term, at least, the man running the country is Tantawi, 75, a close ally of Mubarak’s who served under him as defense minister and commander in chief of the armed forces. The military council’s communique said Tantawi would function as Egypt’s head of state in international relations.

Retired military officers and analysts described Tantawi as pragmatic and conservative, with no visible political aspirations. They said he has the support of other senior commanders, including Lt. Gen. Sami Enan, the armed forces’ chief of staff.

“Tantawi does not have ambitions to run for president. No one in the supreme council has that wish,” said Hosam Sowilam, a retired major general and former military college classmate of Tantawi’s. “We are military people. We don’t want to indulge in any political matters. We want to only participate in defending our territory and preserving the independence and stability of the country.”

Over the years, Tantawi has kept close ties with U.S. government and military officials. “He understands the importance of this relationship,” said Mohamed Kadry Said, a former major general who is an analyst at the Al-Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies in Cairo.

Tantawi is also seen as a reliable ally by Israel, which has feared greater instability with Mubarak’s departure. The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces has affirmed that Egypt will honor its international treaty obligations, including its peace accord with Israel.

But some military analysts said that despite protestations to the contrary, Tantawi and other generals might find that they enjoy ruling Egypt without any checks on their authority.

“In a few months, after they realize how powerful they are and if they believe they can control the country and restore stability, I am not sure they won’t fall in love with their huge influence,” said Giora Eiland, a retired Israeli major general who is an analyst at the Institute for National Security Studies in Tel Aviv. “Under certain circumstances, they can find excuses as to why an election cannot be held at the moment.”

Some demonstrators said they would continue to occupy Tahrir Square until the generals acceded to other demands, including the release of thousands of political prisoners and the repeal of Egypt’s state-of-emergency law, which Mubarak imposed almost 30 years ago as a tool to repress political opponents.

“How can there be freedom as long as the emergency law exists?” said Ram Ebead, 32, an unemployed chemist who has camped out in the plaza since protests erupted Jan. 25. “How can there be freedom without the release of political prisoners?”

Other organizers said they would leave Tahrir Square for now but would return every Friday to pressure the military to make good on its promises.

“The people will be frustrated if the military stays in power more than six months,” said Essam el-Erian, a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood. Analysts said the group stands to benefit from snap elections because it is Egypt’s best-organized political movement.

Erian urged the military to cancel the emergency law and to release the prisoners, many of them Brotherhood supporters. But he also praised the military for the measures it has taken.

“We’re on the right road,” Erian said. “Transitions from dictatorship to democracy are very difficult. It will take time.”

Special correspondent Samuel Sockol contributed to this report.

Ron Paul Speaks Out About the Role of US Foreign Policy in Egypt’s Revolt

11 Feb

Copyright 2011-3011 By Chase Kyla Hunter

Tags: USA foreign policy, ron paul, egypt revolt, mubarak resigns

Breaking: Mubarak Resigns, Egyptians Elated, Roaring Joy in Streets

11 Feb

Copyright 2011-3011 Chase Kyla Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

Hosni Mubarak resigns as president of Egypt

See also: Mubarak Resigns [ BBC coverage ]

See also: Debate Swirls Over Mubarak Legacy

Egyptians roared wildly with joy in Cairo and Alexandria as news spread early this morning that Mubarak would finally step down and the military would be ruling the country temporarily. Chants of “free Egypt!” filled the streets as crowds reacted to the breaking news, after 17 days of nonstop rioting and unrest. The historic uprising leaves many questions and uncertainty about what will happen next in the Mideast. Americans watch closely to see what role, if any the controversial Muslim Brotherhood will play in a newly forming Egyptian government in days to come.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBiK3D8LJG8%5D

Video Footage of the Earlier “Million Man March” which took place in Cairo

Egypt Events: Bible Prophecy Update, Video Clip

11 Feb

2.11.2011 Copyright 2011-3011 By Chase Kyla Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

See also: http://alligatorfarm.wordpress.com/2011/02/07/muslim-brotherhood/

This popular Christian minister from Hawaii [ see video clip below ] is reiterating to his congregation the same message I have been writing for readers and subscribers, and that is that the American federal government is not telling their people the truth about what they really know about the real identity and the anti-Semitic racist, violent and Nazi regime fascist roots of the Muslim Brotherhood.

This minister is asking all the right questions about the odd position our government is now taking, and he is taking note of all the events, which are telling in and of themselves. Read Isaiah 19 for more insight.

Joel 3:19 Egypt shall be a desolation, and Edom shall be a desolate wilderness, for the violence against the children of Judah, because they have shed innocent blood in their land. (20) But Judah shall dwell for ever, and Jerusalem from generation to generation.

Tags: Egypt revolt 2011, Muslim Brotherhood, Radical Islam, roots of Muslim brotherhood, American christian minister speaks about Egypt revolt 2011, Isaiah 19, bible prophecy